sweartotellthetruth

November 12, 2019

Blues and Rhythm Show 263 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, October 29th (10:00 to 12:00 noon

image.png       image.png    image.png

Featured this week on the program a selection of R&B from Los Angeles recorded in the years 1944 to 1957. Blues singers sang about the lure of California from here and there in the 1930s but a wave of migration gave the coast a growing African-American population augmented by the wartime economy and the attraction of wartimes jobs fabricating armaments and wartime materials. A vibrant club scene supported local music and a host of independent labels competing to record local musical talent helped make Los Angeles and the coast a destination for musicians. Most of those labels were short-lived but a few important indies, including Modern, Aladdin and Specialty, emerged to become national players, while Exclusive and Swing Time developed impressive catalogues bvut couldn’t negotiate the transition from 78 to 45 rpm.

Our feature includes a number of talented performers important in their time but without easily recognizable names today.

Also on the program, the Staple Singers, blues from a couple of early country string groups, Leroy CarrMiss Angel and Steve Strongman.

image.png      image.png      image.png

Othe Show:

Wid Bill Moore –  Austin McCoy – Gene Phillips – Clara Smith – Howlin’ Wolf – Leroy Carr – Duke Henderson – Helen Andrews with Johnny Creach Trio – Great Gates – Sherman Booker – Rockin’ Highliners – Hill Billies – Ken Whiteley – Staple Singers and others

program each week at FM 93.3 in Hamilton, live on Cogeco Cable 288 or on CFMU online at CFMU.ca. The program will be available to stream or download until December 31st. CFMU podcasts now available for 8 weeks. Just go the website, bring up the playlist and stream or download the show.

Contact Us:

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week

Bluebird label Blues

cmc

Blues and Rhythm Show 262 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, October 22nd (10:00 to 12:00 noon)

image.png      image.png     image.png

We took a look at the Sun Blues catalogue, records made at Sun Studios between 1951 and 1957. Recording blues for the Modern-RPM and Chess labels was how Sam Phillips started out before those two labels became embroiled in a dispute over which label  had the right to record Howlin’ Wolf and Rosco Gordon. Phillips had recorded each man for both labels. In the end, Modern-RPM got Rosco Gordon as an exclusive artist and began making records without Phillips studio. Howlin’ Wolf remained with Chess but the arrangement between Chess and Sun Studios became unsatisfactory to both sides while Phillips began to issue records on his own Sun label. With his own label, Phillips was able to record Memphis and Delta blues the way he wanted but not to issue all the records he would have liked to. He recorded much more than he could afford to press and distribute.

After 1954, most of Sun’s resources were committed to selling rockabilly and recording blues slowed dramatically. It needs to be pointed out that this was true throughout the industry. Not that blues records stopped being made altogether but if you look closely at the blues discography you can see how the recording careers of so many figures in blues and R&B ended or slowed dramatically around 1954.

Our feature mixed recordings issued by Sun with unissued songs and alternate takes of issued songs from the Sun vaults. Also on the program, a couple of older Memphis bluesmen recorded by Samuel Charters at Sun Studios, the Old South Quartette, some 1950s Memphis Gospel, Michael Pickett and and something from the latest Bobby Radcliff album.

      image.png                                image.png

Othe Show:

HowellDevine –  Harrison Kennedy – Old South Quartette – Memphis Willie B. – Howlin’ Wolf – Doctor Ross – David “Honeyboy” Edwards – Big Memphis Ma Rainey – Little Junior’s Blue Flames – Mose Vinson – Earl Hooker – Songbirds of the South – Angel Voices – and others

Listen to the program each week at FM 93.3 in Hamilton, live on Cogeco Cable 288 or on CFMU online at CFMU.ca. The program will be available to stream or download until December 17h. CFMU podcasts now available for 8 weeks. Just go the website, bring up the playlist and stream or download the show.

Contact Us:

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week

Sun Blues

cmc

image.png

 

 

December 8, 2015

Blues and Rhythm Show 207 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, December 8th, (1:00-2:30 pm).

This week, we carry on with our survey of blues hits from the R&B charts of the 1950s. We left off our first installment in this series, somewhere in 1954.  In this week’s program we resume our survey of 1954 and move to the year 1955. 1955 was the year that rock and roll emerged as a full-fledged cultural phenomenon, a development that would have a large impact upon blues and R&B. 1955, however, was a year in which there were a significant number of blues hit records within the R&B charts. What we can observe is that down home blues records largely disappeared from the charts  in 1953 and ’54 and what remained, with some notable exceptions, was the electric blues of Chicago, the “urban” blues style of Memphis and Houston, and, from the Coast, the former Memphis Blues Boy,  B.B. King’s recordings. Of course, this is partly a matter of definitions. Was Johnny “Guitar” Watson a figure in blues or R&B? We place him on the R&B side, as we do Earl King, who, for a time, filled engagements for Guitar Slim, whom we have placed in the blues category. We think most people would agree that the artists we will be featuring are “blues” artists. Some may quibble with some of the exclusions.

Product Details                                                            ARTHUR GUNTER - BLUES AFTER HOURS  (BLUE HORIZON LP)                           

Whatever else it meant, rock and roll ushered in a new era of youth-oriented music for a youthful audience. Blues and R&B were adult-oriented and came to be seen as something from the past by the new youth audience. But we think there were larger cultural forces at work at the same time. 1954 was the year of the Brown versus Board of Education decision, the legal case that is said to have paved the way to integration and certainly was a catalyst and inspiration for the Civil Rights movement Blues continued to appeal to a segment of the adult population but to an ever smaller demographic.  The rise of Soul music also pushed blues further to the margin in the sixties. There’s a longer argument to be made but we won’t make it tonight.

J.B. Lenoir

Whatever the future of blues in 1955, blues continued to have a strong appeal in the cities of the Midwest, and in the South and blues records could still occasionally attain the upper reaches of the R&B charts. 

On the Show:

Guitar Slim – Howlin’ Wolf– B.B. King – Lowell Fulson – Arthur Gunter – Billy Boy Arnold – Little Junior Parker – Louis Brooks and the Hi-Toppers – J.B. Lenoir– Little George Smith – Little Walter – and others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msumcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until January 4th

Contact Us:

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (December 15th)

TBA

cmc

 

Share this:

September 23, 2013

Blues and Rhythm Show 98 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, September 24th, 2013 (1:00-2:30 pm)

Most of this program will feature music emanating from . Not that we planned a special on Chicago. It just worked out that way.

Chicago was home to a distinctive style of blues in the fifties and beyond. Mention Chicago blues and people have an idea of what you are talking about. After World War 2, independent record companies sprang up in Chicago to exploit local talent and markets. Miracle, Aristocrat-Chess, Parkway, Chance, VeeJay, United/States, USA were among the labels recording blues and gospel in the city. This evolution of local labels and studios supporting local music continued through the sixties with the rise of soul music and Chicago represented its distinctive soul styles on both locally based and on national labels. OKeh and Brunswick each operated from Chicago offices for a period of time. In the end, both blues and soul were eclipsed by disco and, later, hip-hop but not before the labels that recorded and marketed the music disappeared one by one or were the object of corporate takeovers, like GRT Corporation’s purchase of Chess and the move of Chess company headquarters to Los Angeles. 

All of the above is background to the music which was created by waves of African-American migrants to Chicago as well as and in combination with native born Chicagoans like Billy Boy Arnold. And even after the labels folded or were bought out, artists like Syl johnson and Tyrone Davis continued to perform for local audiences while new generations of performers have emerged to carry on and renew the blues and soul traditions of the city in a changing demographic. As national trends shifted away from blues and soul, Chicago still had the critical mass of support to sustain some kind of local scene.

Included on the program, once more, will be three of the headliners of the Blues Explosion show, scheduled for this coming Friday, September 27th, at Hamilton Place.

On the Show:

L.C. McKinley – Howlin’ Wolf –  Mighty Joe Young – Johnny B. Moore – Ricky Allen – Erma Franklin – Lucy Smith – Staple Singers – Norfleet Brothers – and others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until October 22nd.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (October 1st)

We don’t have a plan yet for next week’s show. We might include some R&B vocal groups.

Upcoming programs

It’s a new season and we’re working on some rough ideas for programming themes for The Blues & Rhythm Show in the coming months. We’ll list some of them on this blogsite soon.

cmc

 

Blog at WordPress.com.