sweartotellthetruth

June 9, 2015

Blues and Rhythm Show 183 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, June 9th, (1:00-2:30 pm)

This week, the promised followup special covering Chicago Soul. We cover a period extending from 1961 to 1975 but most of the recordings are from the sixties. Soul music combined elements of gospel, R&B, blues and, especially in the south, country music. In Chicago, the blues element was more pronounced and singers like Tyrone Davis, Syl Johnson and Lee “Shot” Williams were performing blues before they became known as soul artists. If you doubt that the transition was meaningful, think about Syl Johnson’s initial response when he was asked to perform and record blues again. He thought that he and his music were being dissed by the new blues community. Of course, “soul”, like “blues”, was a marketing concept as much as it effectively defined a genre of music.”Soul” describes music whose characteristics are at least as diffuse as blues.

We’re short of time. Let’s conclude by saying there was a lot of blues in Chicago soul music.

On the Show:

Young Holt Trio – Syl Johnson – Jerry Butler – Ricky Allen – Gerri Taylor – Harold Burrage – Lee “Shot” Williams – Mamie Galore – Otis Clay – Tyrone Davis

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until July 7th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (June 16th)

Juneteenth

cmc

April 22, 2015

Blues and Rhythm Show 177 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario) – REPEAT

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, April 21st, (1:00-2:30 pm)

Chicago Soul special: Long story. We had in mind to take this week off but last week’s show went off the rails because we left some material for the show at home. We also had a malfunctioning audio pot on our on-air board although it was repaired during the program. Anyway, we decided to repeat last week’s program but as it was planned, so this week’s program is a repeat of last week’s, albeit with the complete playlist and a working audio board.

Today the terms “Blues” and “Soul” are often combined in a phrase and no one blinks. Blues and Soul shows. Soul and Blues festivals. There was a time when soul music was the enemy for come-lately fans of blues. Blues were authentic and organic; Soul was the inauthentic progeny of commerce. Even B.B. King and Bobby Bland were condemned in some quarters as betrayers of the real blues tradition. How far away that all seems. Meanwhile, performers like James Cotton and Junior Wells were adapting their repertoires and songlists, and others, like Little Milton and Syl Johnson became known as soul artists even though they’d begun singing and playing blues.

Besides electric versions of down-home blues, Chicago was also home to R&B combos and vocal groups. And it was the base for important gospel acts although many of the labels that recorded gospel were located in New York or on the Coast.

All of the strands of Chicago’s African American music were reflected somewhere in the development of soul music in Chicago. The music was quite diverse. Those who grew up in the south, like Otis Clay, Lee Williams, and Syl Johnson, tended to draw more upon on the blues or hard gospel. Vocal groups that formed in the Chicago high schools, like the Impressions, favoured cooler sounds.

Chicago had its own soul labels, artists, songwriters, producers and arrangers. Soul music from Chicago could be identified by its distinct vocal harmonies, brass arrangements, and rhythm, distinct from Stax or Muscle Shoals, or from Motown.

We were working on a new playlist for this week’s show but we got busy and when we looked back at an earlier playlist from 30 months ago we decided we’d rework and repeat that particular show. We’ll present the new program in the coming weeks.

On the Show:

Willie Henderson – Moonglows – Impressions – Bobby Miller – Etta James – Knight Brothers – Gene Chandler – Laura Lee – Lee “Shot” Williams – Barbara Acklin – Otis Clay – and many others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until May 18th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (April 28th)

TBA.

cmc

April 13, 2015

Blues and Rhythm Show 176 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, April 14th, (1:00-2:30 pm)

Today the terms “Blues” and “Soul” are often combined in a phrase and no one blinks. Blues and Soul shows. Soul and Blues festivals. There was a time when soul music was the enemy for come-lately fans of blues. Blues were authentic and organic; Soul was the inauthentic progeny of commerce. Even B.B. King and Bobby Bland were condemned in some quarters as betrayers of the real blues tradition. How far away that all seems. Meanwhile, performers like James Cotton and Junior Wells were adapting their repertoires and songlists, and others, like Little Milton and Syl Johnson became known as soul artists even though they’d begun singing and playing blues.

Besides electric versions of down-home blues, Chicago was also home to R&B combos and vocal groups. And it was the base for important gospel acts although many of the labels that recorded gospel were located in New York or on the Coast.

All of the strands of Chicago’s African American music were reflected somewhere in the development of soul music in Chicago. The music was quite diverse. Those who grew up in the south, like Otis Clay, Lee Williams, and Syl Johnson, tended to draw more upon on the blues or hard gospel. Vocal groups that formed in the Chicago high schools, like the Impressions, favoured cooler sounds.

Chicago had its own soul labels, artists, songwriters, producers and arrangers. Soul music from Chicago could be identified by its distinct vocal harmonies, brass arrangements, and rhythm, distinct from Stax or Muscle Shoals, or from Motown.

We were working on a new playlist for this week’s show but we got busy and when we looked back at an earlier playlist from 30 months ago we decided we’d rework and repeat that particular show. We’ll present the new program in the coming weeks.

On the Show:

Willie Henderson – Moonglows – Impressions – Bobby Miller – Etta James – Knight Brothers – Gene Chandler – Laura Lee – Lee “Shot” Williams – Barbara Acklin – Otis Clay – and many others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until May 11th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (April 21st)

TBA. Watch this space.

cmc

April 7, 2015

Blues and Rhythm Show 175 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, April 7th, (1:00-2:30 pm)

No special theme this week. On the show, we have a pair of B.B. King and Bobby Bland soundalikes plus the originals, old-time white country blues, the dozens, “postmodern” blues, reissued and expanded live Staples Singers from Columbia/Epic Legacy and more from the last Pops Staples album

On the Show:

David “Honeyboy” Edwards – Lee “Shot” Williams – Ray Agee – Bobby “Blue” Bland – Sam McGee – Speckled Red – Harrison Kennedy – Frankie & Jimmy – Pops Staples – Precious Bryant – and others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until May 4th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (April 14th)

TBA.

cmc

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November 25, 2014

Blues and Rhythm Show 157 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, November 25th, (1:00-2:30 pm)

We’re doing a few things on this program. We go back to a figure we neglected until last week, Little Mack Simmons, track from a new Electro-Fi CD from Harrison Kennedy, field recordings from Florida and from upstate New York! We’ll also feature some rare, reissued tracks in blues and in R&B, including the only singles by a couple of female singers and a pair of honking saxophone players.

On the Show:

Bill Doggett – Lil’ Ed & the Blues Imperials – Little Mack Simmons – Otis “Big Smokey” Smothers – Ginger St. James & the Grinders – Richard Williams – Elroy Hart – Cliff Bivins – La Melle Prince – Sax Kari – Lee “Shot” Williams

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until December 24th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (December 2nd)

We may put together a feature on classic singers of the 1920s before Christmas but it may not be next week.

cmc

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