sweartotellthetruth

October 27, 2020

Blues and Rhythm Show 295 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, October 27, 2020 (10:00 to 12:00 noon)

This week’s program has some classic R&B, a brief look at the great guitar player, Lonnie Johnson; more from the Blues Revival out of St. Louis and Chicago, Hillbilly Boogie & Western Swing; classic and retro Soul. There’s some piano blues and some mandolin in the mix

“The jailhouse, boys, is a lonesome place ‘specially when the when the turnkey slams the door in your face” — Lonnie Johnson

On the Show

Louis Jordan & the Tympany Five – Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson – Blue Lu Barker – Jimmy Liggins – John Lee Granderson – James “Stump” Johnson – Lonnie Johnson – Carl Martin – Armstrong Twins – Cotton Thompson – Ruby Johnson – Butanes – Don Johnson – and others.

Listen to the program each week at FM 93.3 in Hamilton, live on Cogeco Cable 288 or on CFMU online at cfmu.ca. The program will be available to stream or download until for eight weeks until December 15th as a podcast. Just go the website, bring up the right playlist and stream or download the show.

Contact Us:

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com. You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next Week

TBA


June 4, 2019

Blues and Rhythm Show 247 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, June 4th (10:00 to 12:00noon)

After four weeks in the Tuesday morning 10:00 slot the program becomes official in the CFMU schedule this week. We’ll be here at 10:00 Tuesday mornings in the coming weeks. We may consider a change in the schedule in the fall but we’re going to try to make this timeslot work for us.

As this will be our first show not as a fill in for Out With It, which previously occupied this place in the schedule, we’re going to use the June 4th program as a survey-showcase of what we will be doing on the show week to week.

Blues, Rhythm & Blues, Soul and Gospel on this week’s show–R&B from 1949 to 1954, Blues from 1934 to 1950, Soul from several famous studios in the south and Chicago and Gospel from the “Golden Era” and later. With the two-hour format in the morning, we will likely present more of a magazine format rather than long features but we won’t know for sure until we work with the two hour

On the Show:

Eskew Reeder – Ricky Allen – Lalo Guerrero – Five Royales – Memphis Minnie – Lonnie Johnson – Walter Davis – Sue Foley – Magic Slim – Johnnie Taylor – Erma Coffee – Brother Joe May – Inez Andrews & the Andrewettes – Sojourners – and others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton, live on Cogeco Cable 288 or on CFMU online at the CFMU website. The program will be available to stream or download until August 6th. CFMU podcasts now available for 8 weeks. Couldn’t be easier. Just go the website, bring up the playlist and stream or download the show.

Contact Us:

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week

Check back with this site. In two weeks, a Texas special for Juneteenth.

cmc

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September 22, 2015

Blues and Rhythm Show 197 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, September 22nd, (1:00-2:30 pm).

Ralph Peer had a large role in determining how and when roots music–blues and country–appeared on commercial records.  He appears to have presided over the first African-American blues record and the first commercial hillbilly record and, established a path that the rest of the industry quickly followed in both fields. Understanding the potential of the southern market for roots recordings, he was the first to employ recording field trips to find new material for the OKeh label. When he left OKeh, he took his knowledge and techniques to the Victor label. Soon after his arrival at Victor he organized the famous Bristol sessions where he found and recorded the Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers, the single event for which he is best known. The list of performers he brought to the OKeh and Victor catalogues was impressive as was their recorded output. Peer was either extremely fortunate to be positioned where and when he was in the industry or he had the vision to understand the potential of roots music markets before others. Peer explained his method as looking for what was familiar in a song but with something new in it. He decided who would record what songs for his labels and at some point soon in his career became comfortable with suggesting how they should arrange a song. In business, he was an innovator. He took no salary from Victor but took his earnings from the per-disc mechanical royalties paid to copyright holders of recorded songs. This gave him and his performers an incentive to record songs that were new and unique to record and also to encourage other labels to record songs he had copyrighted. When the RCA Company became concerned about anti-trust, tit sold Southern Music Publishing the company he had established to handle copyrights at Victor to Peer and Peer built a large international music publishing business from that foundation. Our show looks at the race and country recordings Peer produced between 1920 and 1920. Our show is largely based upon information contained in Barry Mazor’s biography of Ralph Peer, Ralph Peer and the Making of Popular Roots Music, a book we recommend highly.

Product Details

On the Show:

James P. Johnson – Mamie Smith – Norfolk Jazz Quartet – Fiddlin John Carson – Sylvester Weaver – Ernest Stoneman – Lonnie Johnson – Richard “Rabbit” Brown – Carter Family – Ernest Phipps & His Holiness Singers – a.o.

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msumcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until October 18th.

Contact Us To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com. You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (September 29th)

TBA.

cmc

May 26, 2015

Blues and Rhythm Show 181 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — cmcompton @ 4:10 am

Swear to Tell the Truthfor Tuesday, May 26th, (1:00-2:30 pm)

On this week’s program, we present a tribute to B.B. King who died two weeks ago Wednesday. We’ll be mostly following a playlist we developed for a program we presented last July. The show showcased a few of B’s most important influences and then followed the course of his early career on records.

The description we gave for that earlier program explains the approach we took last July:

“Considering his place in blues history, we’ve played relatively little B.B. King over 139 shows. A listener suggested we put a B.B. King feature or special on the air and we thought it was high time that we did that. Whenever we concentrate our attention on a particular artist or theme we find ourselves going back to music we’ve overlooked, forgotten or misremembered and our research turns up information we’d forgotten or never knew about in the first place. In the case of B.B. King, we read the man’s autobiography for the first time, a book co-authored with David Ritz. In the book, King recalls the criticism he and Bobby Bland encountered from new white blues fans during the so-called blues revival. His music and Bland’s was condemned as commercial and a sell-out by people whose point of entry to blues was the folk movement. In time, the folk purism dissipated and British commentators, as well as some British musicians, had a lot to do with the inevitable reassessment of B.’s music and his place in the blues tradition. Still, King recalled the period before that happened as a time when his music was being rejected by both its traditional audience, now engaged by soul music, and the new audience who saw it as a betrayal of a tradition they barely knew about. Today, B.B. King enjoys almost universal and largely uncritical celebration. His dedication to studying his craft and improving his technique appear to have been lifelong commitments, as attested to by former members of his bands. As a DJ and a student of his own tradition he has developed a broad awareness of blues before and after B.B. King and not just blues. B’s musical interest is pretty wide-ranging.

Our feature deals with the period of greatness when B.B. King and his audience were in the same place and B. was extending the horizon of blues and taking the audience with him.”

On the Show:

B.B. King – Lonnie Johnson – Charlie Christian – Roy Brown

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until Jun 23rd.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (June 2nd)

Magazine show – no special theme

cmc

October 27, 2013

Blues and Rhythm Show 103 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, October 29th, 2013 (1:00-2:30 pm)

We have not programmed a lot of white country blues week to week. Recently, we took a look at our composite playlist and recognized how little of this music we’d managed to fit into the show. We suggested last week we might do a feature on Western Swing but the feature we have put together would be better characterized as Old Timey, covering the period 1924-1935. White Country Blues serve some of the same functions as blues in the African-American tradition. They serve at times  as ironic commentary, humour, and even social protest. Some singers, like Jimmy Davis, Gene Autry and Cliff Carlisle, specialized, at least part of the time, in “blue” blues. White Country Blues also at times betrayed a fascination with African American music, speech and behaviour. Some white blues amounted to parody of black style, like the minstrel tradition, and, as with the minstrel tradition, some parody appeared to be sympathetic, even, at times, admiring, and some contemptuous and hateful. 

In the set we’ve prepared we haven’t sought out the songs that were topical or salacious. It’s a selection of blues that we hope will illustrate simply that blues was a significant part of Old Time or Hillbilly music, beside the ballads and breakdowns. 

On the Show

Lonnie Johnson – Bukka White – Big Chief Ellis  – Morgan Davis – Uncle Dave Macon – Frank Hutchinson – Dock Boggs – Charlie Poole & the North Carolina Ramblers – Riley Puckett – Holmes Brothers – and many others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until November 26th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (November 5th)

Undetermined as of today. We’ll update.

Errors and Omissions

Last week (BRS 102), we played Curtis Jones, but we failed to mention that, like Memphis Slim and Eddie Boyd, Curtis Jones moved to Europe in the 1960s and made records there. He also made a well-received album for Delmark, in Chicago.

We experienced several skips on the CD track we played by Curtis Jones, “Bad Avenue Blues”. The CD players at the station are quite sensitive. We examined the surface of the disc to see a flaw or anything on the surface to cause the problem but couldn’t find the source of the malfunction.

cmc

 
 

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