sweartotellthetruth

August 4, 2019

Blues and Rhythm Show 253 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, July 30th (10:00 to 12:00 noon)

This week’s program included a special devoted to Louisiana music, mostly of the fifties and early sixties but including tracks from the forties to the eighties. Swamp blues, R&B, Cajun and Zydeco. That took up the greater part of the program but we also took a look at the Smithsonian Folkways album devoted to Lead Belly‘s recordings for Moses Asch’s various label ventures, recordings made between 1941 and 1948. Leadbelly had spent time previously in a Texas prison but the Lomaxes met up with him in the Angola Penitentiary and he grew up in the Caddo Lake region of western Louisiana.

image.png        image.png     image.png

On the Show:

Guitar Gable – Lightnin’ Slim – Lonesome Sundown – Clarence Garlow – Classie Ballou – Nathan Abshire – Thaddeus Declouet  – Buckwheat Zydeco – Robert Pete Williams – Lead Belly – Barbara Lynn – and others

Listen to the program each week at FM 93.3 in Hamilton, live on Cogeco Cable 288 or on CFMU online at the CFMU website. The program will be available to stream or download until September 24th. CFMU podcasts now available for 8 weeks. Just go the website, bring up the playlist and stream or download the show.

Contact Us:

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week

Check back with this site.

cmc

image.png

August 4, 2015

Blues and Rhythm Show 191 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, August 4th, (1:00-2:30 pm)

Greater part of this week’s show devoted to Cajun blues from the earliest recordings through to the beginnings of the Cajun revival of the fifties. We cover the years roughly 1929-1952. Traditional Cajun music featured the accordion and the fiddle but, in the mid-thirties, tastes shifted to French-accented Western Swing. At least, that’s what the record companies offered for the most part and what the dance clubs featured, and it remained the case until the late forties, by which time local independent labels were springing up to fill the void left by the big labels after the war. Western Swing and Cajun Honky Tonk remained popular but there was also a return to and a hardening of the sound of traditional Cajun music. The culmination in some peoples’ minds was the hard Cajun rock and roll of Cleveland Crochet’s 1960 “Sugar Bee” with Vorris “Shorty” LeBlanc on accordion and Jay Stutes, steel guitar and vocal. Through all the transitions in style and popular taste in the recording era blues have been prominent in Cajun music.

On the Show:

Robert Pete Williams – Diana Braithwaite & Chris Whiteley – Soileau & Robin – Amédé Ardoin & Dennis McGee – Hackberry Ramblers – Happy Fats & Rayne-Bo Ramblers – Harry Choates – Nathan Abshire – Clifton Chenier – Trudy Lynn – a.o.

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msumcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until September 1st.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (August 11th)

TBA

cmc

July 28, 2013

Blues and Rhythm Show 90 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, July 30th, 2013 (1:00-2:30 pm)

Allons jouer les blues. This week’s program was supposed to be devoted to Louisiana music but, in the course of preparing the playlist, we narrowed the scope to Cajun and zydeco music. We will come back and do a Louisiana special. looking at the whole spectrum of African-American in Louisiana, but, this week, we thought we’d look at French music, zydeco and Cajun music, in a bit of depth. Not the place to be if you hate accordions and fiddles. These musics are the musics of the rural areas and towns. You will often hear Louisiana music equated with the traditions of New Orleans but, historically, the city and the countryside had distinct musical cultures. On the other hand, when so-called Creoles moved to Houston or the Bay area, their music came with them. Similarly, although Cajun and Creole music have been close at times, they have inevitably followed different paths to the present and, while there have been many cross influences between two musical cultures, they have had different repertoire, instrumentation and style.

On the show: 

Fernest Arceneaux  –  Rockin’ Dopcee  –  Amedé Ardoin & Dennis McGee – Leo Soileau – Hackberry Ramblers –  Buckwheat Zydeco – Nathan Abshire – Lynn August – Wayne Toups & Zydecajun – and others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until August 27th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (August 6th)

Repeat of the Alan Lomax Southern Journey special for August 6th.

cmc

Blog at WordPress.com.