sweartotellthetruth

December 30, 2014

Blues and Rhythm Show 160 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, December 16th, (1:00-2:30 pm)

Our program the week before Christmas featured several songs with Christmas references but not really Christmas themed. These songs regularly fill out Christmas compilation albums.

There was no particular theme to the program but we did highlight some significant albums that appeared in 2014, without attempting to rank them or assemble any kind of comprehensive list.

On the Show:

McKinney’s Cotton Pickers – Big Three Trio – Blind Boy Fuller – Little Miss Higgins – Reverend Robert Wilkins – The Wandering Five – Candi Staton – David Wilcox – Tracy Nelson – and others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.msu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until January 14th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (December 23rd)

Our Christmas special

cmc

May 10, 2014

Blues and Rhythm Show 129 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, April 29, 2014 (1:00-2:30 pm)

Our program from April 29th is still available to stream or download until May 26th. The show was a followup to out April 15th program devoted to what we called the prehistory of “The Blues Revival”. In the program we traced the evolution of mainstream interest in the blues from the so-called folk blues of the “rediscovered” artists of the twenties and thirties who suddenly found their music in demand from a new folk-oriented blues audience to the electric blues of the 1950s from performers who had already given up full-time music, like J.B. Hutto, and some who were grinding out a living playing for a diminishing black audience, For all the artists involved the new interest was very different from anything they had experienced before. When Hound Dog Taylor found himself in demand beyond the Chicago clubs he’d been playing, his peers warned him he would now have to subject himself to interviews, nothing he;d had to worry about before. The electric bands, who had to decide to what extent they accommodated or fended off requests from African-American audiences for contemporary soul numbers, now heard shouted requests every night for “Sweet Home Chicago” from their new audiences. 

Whatever the quality of the music the “revival” produced, the shift in the audience demographic changed the music so that even the corners of the commercial music industry that still catered to a hard-core African-American blues audience couldn’t completely escape the influence of the new blues market. On the other hand, the blues revival began a more-or-less systematic appraisal and rediscovery of every stream and tributary of blues history and schools of devotees dedicated to pre- or post-war blues, “classic” or “country”, “electric” or “down-home”, “rhythm & blues” and, eventually, “soul blues”. And in every school could be found a hard-core of purists. 

Of course, there was another aspect to the Blues Revival and that was the rise of mostly white blues players, who did not grow up in the tradition–those for whom blues was a stage in the development of their musical style and those who dedicated a career to a version of the blues. We only touched on this part of the story in this program and our earlier show of two weeks ago. And perhaps we should devote a program to that particular phenomenon, which may not be so well known in detail even if it is an essential part of the history of Rock.

On the Show:

Lightnin’ Hopkins – Mississippi John Hurt – Skip James – Mance Lipscomb – John Lee Hooker – Paul Butterfield Blues Band – Otis Spann – J.B. Hutto – Reverend Robert Wilkins – and others

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until May 26th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (May 6th)

We can say now that our May 6th program was a 90 minute feature devoted to early rhythm & blues sounds. 

cmc

 

April 15, 2014

Blues and Rhythm Show 127 on 93.3 CFMU (Hamilton, Ontario)

Swear to Tell the Truth for Tuesday, April 15, 2014 (1:00-2:30 pm)

This week’s program is about the years preceding the so-called “Blues Revival”. The term was based upon the idea that the blues had been lost and needed to be rediscovered or revived. The Blues Revival was about artists and styles from the past history of the blues. It was about Son House, Bessie Smith, and Bukka White, rather than contemporary stars like B.B. King, Bobby Bland and Junior Parker. Our first idea was to devote a single program to the phenomenon of the Blues Revival but we decided to expand our coverage to include the prehistory of the revival, starting in the 1930s. This week’s program tracks the changes in mainstream attention to and interest in the blues and we conclude that what the Blues Revival really describes is the new and rapidly expanding folk audience’s discovery of music most of America didn’t know anything about. The revival began with interest in the blues of the twenties and thirties and was partly inspired and given impetus by the 78 collector culture and interest in the artists who made the records twenty to forty years earlier. Interest soon extended to classic Chicago blues, music only a decade past at the time. By the end of the sixties, writers like Paul Oliver had begun the task of writing the history of blues in close detail. 

A byproduct of the Blues Revival is the huge amount of research and study that has been devoted to this corner of American musical and cultural history since the sixties. Today’s program tracks the stages in mainstream America’s interest in and exposure to blues from the late 1930s to the late fifties and early sixties.

On the Show:

Leadbelly – Joe Turner – Sonny Terry – Pink Anderson – Furry Lewis – Scrapper Blackwell – Memphis Slim – Alberta Hunter – Dave Van Ronk – Reverend Robert Wilkins

Listen to the program at FM 93.3 in Hamilton or on CFMU online at cfmu.mcmaster.ca. The program will be available to stream or as a podcast until May 12th.

Contact Us

To reach us with comments or queries, write us at sweartotellthetruth@gmail.com.

You can also follow the program at sweartotellthetruth@nosignifying on Twitter.

Next week (April 22nd)

Don’t yet have a plan but we’ll mix things up on next week’s program. Check the blogsite closer to the date.

cmc

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